Dive Sites

Lady of the Isles

Categories:

The Lady of the Isles was a cable layer for the navy at the time of it's sinking. It was under tow when it hit a mine. It now lies in a depth of around 52m and is another easy trimix dive. Small enough to complete in a single trimix dive, the stern is quite intact while the bow section is quite broken.

 

Rinovia

Categories:

The Rinovia was a steam fishing vessel, requisitioned as a mine sweeper in 1939. In 1940, it hit a mine and sank. It now lies in around 55m and is a really nice shallow trimix dive. It is small enough to be covered in a single dive, even at this depth. Lying fairly intact and upright, it can have a covering of fishing nets, which are themselves, normally covered in Plumose anemones..

 

Sevra Wreck

Categories:

Little remains of the wreck of the Sevra. There is some discussion as to which wreckage belongs to the Sevra and that of the AN2, both were very similar ships and both used as mine sweepers. Not an easy site to find, it can be easily missed underwater too, it is quite flat,

 

Turnaware Bar

Categories:

Turnaware Bar is one of our fall-back locations. Sheltered from virtually every wind direction, it isn't a bad dive. The area was used during WWII by American Ships before the D-Day landings, every now and then a piece of nostalgia turns up. A mxaimum depth of 18m, a site that can only be dived at slack water.

Pencra Reef & Tol Peg

Categories:

Pencra Reef is a slowly shelving reef near the Manacles. Deep narrow gullies are full of life
 whilst in the shallows, Tol Peg, is colourful and covered in Jewel Anemones.

Falmouth Bay Snorkeling

Categories:
Snorkel Falmouth

Andola Wreck

Categories:

The Andola was a 2045 ton, 84m long fully rigged sailing ship. It hit the Manacles Reef on 31/01/1895 in bad weather. Now well broken and lying quite flat it is an easy shallow dive, at a maximum depth of around 8-9m.

Helford Pool and Drift

Categories:

The Helford Pool is a natural pool in the Helford river where it narrows between Helford village and the Helford Passage. It is best dived just after high water on a spring tide. This increases the chance of better visibility and creates an exhilarating drift dive, out of the pool and into the estuary. Starting the dive at the west end of the pit, the drift will slowly take you to the east end where it will force you out into the shallows, past Maerl beds, and, depending on whether you swim north, east or south, you’ll end up in the Bone Yard, the Voluntary Marine Conservation Area or the Oyster Farm.

Over the years, lots of bits and pieces have ended up in the pool. Bottles of all ages are very common.

St Just Pool

Categories:

St Just Pool refers to an area within the Carrick Roads, it’s where the deep river channel turns from south to west causing a deep pool. Although we wouldn’t class it as one of our better dive sites, it is in an extremely sheltered area. With depths ranging from 4m to 30m, it is a ‘fall back’ dive site for when the sea is too rough to venture out. It usually has some interesting life including Thornback Rays, Hermit Crabs and Variegated Scallops. Rumour has it that there is some remains of a Sunderland Flying Boat in there somewhere, although we’ve never seen it, yet.

With the area there is a small wall, from 15m to 18m. Stuck at one end is the remains of an old scallop dredge, the rest of the wall has an interesting range of life, making it the most interesting part of the dive.

Falmouth Dives 12m -18m

Categories:

Falmouth has a wide range of dives sites in all depths. Here is a list of our local dive sites between 12-18m deep.

  1. East Narrows Wall
  2. Stanwood Wreck
  3. St Just Pool
  4. Hera Wreck
  5. Rock Island Bridge Wreck (HW)
  6. Volnay Wreck (LW)
  7. Bizzies Reef
  8. Old Wall Reef
  9. Manacles Reef
  10. Lady Dalhousie Wreck 
  11. Helford Pool and Drift Dive